All About Agile | Agile Development Made Easy


Avoiding Mini-Waterfalls

by George Dinwiddie, 1 November 2012 | The Agile Blogosphere

This post is from George Dinwiddie's blog by George Dinwiddie. Click here to see the original post in full.

A lot of people and organizations, when transitioning from a serial software development lifecycle toward an Agile one, fall into the pattern of mini-waterfalls. They start doing iterations, but each iteration resembles the development lifecycle they already know. The programmers do some design work, then they write the code to implement the design, then unit test the code, and then they pass it to the testers for testing. To many people, this is the only way it can work. Their mental model only admits to this series of phases.


And they run into typical problems. Sometimes the design doesn’t fit the problem well, and patches are needed because there isn’t time to go back to design. The testers get squeezed for time at the end of the iteration, and no one knows how to accommodate the rework when a problem is found. More patches are added, because there isn’t time to redesign. And the next iteration starts the cycle over again.


Sure, doing this in two to four week cycles beats doing it in six to twelve month cycles. But only a little. Most of the time, it starts to fall apart if the team doesn’t learn to work differently.


But it’s inevitable, they say.


No, it’s not inevitable. Some teams don’t work in a serial fashion....

read more

Home



Leave a Reply

What is 10 + 10 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
Please do this simple sum so I know you are human:)